Could Kim Jong Un's daughter ever be leader?

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STORY: The unexpected appearance of Kim Jong Un's daughter at a recent missile test has raised speculation that she could be a successor in making.

If true, analysts say, it would be an unprecedented uphill struggle in the male-dominated dynasty.

Saturday marked the first official confirmation that Kim has children.

The North Korean leader's daughter - who was not named in state media -

appeared in coverage that day of a ballistic missile launch,

watching the firing and holding her father's hand as he examined the weapon.

Women - including Kim's sister Yo Jong - have held positions of power over the years.

But would his daughter have a shot at the very top?

North Korean defector Hyun In-Ae is a visiting research fellow at Ewha Institute of Unification Studies.

"When I was in North Korea, I had a perception that a leader should be a man. In North Korea, it is said that women have equal rights, but women are still seen as supporting figures for men. Marking Mother's Day on November 16, the North had published an editorial. It says a mother’s role is to raise children well and make them contribute to the country."

The existence of Kim's daughter was first revealed by U.S. basketball star Dennis Rodman.

He visited North Korea in 2013 and spent time with Kim's family,

later telling a British newspaper he held a "baby" daughter named Ju Ae.

Some analysts argue that despite North Korea's deeply patriarchal society,

gender may not disqualify a daughter or other woman from taking the reins.

Kim has elevated several powerful women around him.

His sister, Yo Jong, is spearheading a new, tougher campaign to put pressure on South Korea.

And, according to that country's intelligence, in some cases operates as a "de facto" second in command.

Choe Son Hui is the country’s first female foreign minister.

It is far too early to know if Kim's daughter is being seen as next in line, analysts say,

or whether her appearance on Friday was just a symbol.

A prop used to portray Kim as a loving father,

and assure citizens that nuclear weapons would protect children.